About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 8
CNBC 4
FBC 4
CSPAN2 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
MSNBCW 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able to borrow money. >> brenda: julian, you can go ahead and respond. >> first of all, the ernst & young study has been debunked over and over. and number two, the bush tax cuts, if you let the bush tax cuts. the crs study was a republican study and found the same thing as the cbo. if you let bush tax cuts expire on everybody, yes, you would have negative economic impact. the two staetudies done recentl shows the top two rates, top 2%, virtually no impact. to jonas' point if you raise taxes a the lot and cut spending a lot and so austerity plan, that would have an impact. democrats were for pouring more money into the compli with stimulus and republicans wanted austerity and jonas' point is an argument against what conservatives were pushing for. >> brenda: all right. toby. >> what's the question? >> driving a smart car. >> and we did a survey of 1500 small business peoples more in the 2%, revenue or
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
ban them and it -- >> greg: the funny thing is we talk about greece, but before there was greece, there was detroit. detroit is greece. if it was only the acropolis. dead city. people left because they couldn't make a living, the unions suffocate pod tenial. >> bob: true about toledo and cleveland and cincinnati? the northern cities that have had bleed of workers? >> eric: i will make a wage with you. now that snyder signs it off and right to work, i bet an auto company goes -- brand new, never done business before in detroit. >> kimberly: you will lose this bet, bob. >> eric: coming up, 2004 south korean singer rapped about killing americans in 2019 and is invited to perform for president obama. ♪ ♪ >> eric: maybe not. we will gangmam bang it out next. and make sure you go to the facebook page. we are updating and posting facebook.com/thefivefnc. click like. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only
and greece top 25% with youth unemployment in both those countries near 60% news out of the midwest about the economy could bode well for today's national ism number. the chicago mni index---also known as known as pmi---shows a rating of 50.4 for november. a number above 50 indicates economic expansion. joining us now is alyce andres-frantz of chicago mni report. good morning. how are you summing up this latest report? are these numbers good enough? if you look at this report optically it looks very good. you have production up---employment tracking production. you have supplier deliveries lengthening and prices paid up big this month. when you take those four together you think wow this is a really great number but the big key here is new orders down. 5.3 plunging deeper into contraction at 45.3. it's the lowest level since june 2009. this is the biggest weight to this business barometer and this is the thing that held it down this month. you also have a situation this month where we have order backlogs up but still in contraction. it's just not a pretty picture when you have new orders
or any american congress borrow anymore money until with fix this country from becoming greece. that requires significant entitlement reform to save social from bankruptcy and medicare from bankruptcy. social security is going bankrupt in about 20, 25 years. medicare is going bankrupt in 15 or 20 years. the baby boomers are coming in at 10,000 a day. and we just can't scene this. martha: president last week said we'll not play that game. last time around they wouldn't let the debt ceiling go up, i tell you right now, something to this effect we will play that game. >> we will play that game, mr. president. that is not a game. the game you're play something small ball. you're talking about raising rates on top 2% that would run the government for 11 days. you got reelected. how about doing something big that is not liberal? how about doing something big that is bipartisan. every big idea he has is a liberal idea that drowns us in debt. how been maing up, mr. president and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece? doing what boehner, tip o'n
. because if there is ever going to be a change, if michigan will be saved and not become worse than greece, it will be because of the governor snider and the republicans. >> and the president went there jed and a made his public comments. these are his supporters. >> oh, yes. >> he appeals to the union workers. >> well, beyond him not condemning it, why is he supporting a system that has led to no jobs in that state? the state is bankrupt. it is detroit. you don't -- >> next question. is michigan a preview of coming attractions for america because of democratic policies? because that is the outcrop of what happened in michigan. >> we have a series of greeces around the country. and one piece of good news is probably the first state to go bankrupt is california. california is so left wing, they could never elect a republican governor. neither republicans or democrats have an incentive to bail it out so i don't think we will see a federal bailout. fortunately california will go first and probably not michigan. >> ann coulter, great to he sue. >> last show of the year. see you next year, sean
to the trading day. investors are waiting for the results of greece's bond buyback program occurs. joe has some of the big corporate news and this one is actually a global corporate story. >> hsbc. we're talking about paying $1.9 billion in the money lawnering lapses. a brirchb lender admitting to a breakdown of controls, in a statement announcing a deferred payment. yesterday standard chartered agreed to pay $27 million agreeing that it violates sanctions against iran and two other international companies. >> if you're an international bank and you prael without getting into this kind of trouble? >> no. >> can you actually operate without money laundering? >> i'm just saying, if you're going to be in business in all these types of markets, isn't this going to happen? >> aren't there sxwier countries that would be probably -- that it would stead if you don't want any business tale. >> was there a fascination in this country about whether you want to indict the whole institution or what happens systemically. >> is this your sequel? >> i was on the phone last night. one of the two publishers that
the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an orderly fashion. timothy masssad will join us later. this could be a buy signal with the government signaling i
and "detroit city is the place to be: the afterlife of an american metropolis" -- rome and greece, sort of when it becomes i have no idea. >> i am -- >> my former neighbor. >> great neighbor. >> my question is i love detroit. tremendously. in love with the city still. back now six years and every day i find something new and fall in love with and in the city and not outside the city and my question is what neighborhood or area do you find most fascinating? this is either the core or the bombshell, you had to go there. >> it is our street. this was a weird moment of serendipity. i was looking for a semi furnished apartment and found that on craigslist and rented the place, the single block at service street which is not far from where you grew up. >> when i grew up the bad things we did -- there were some shops back there. >> i used to make delivery in the butcher shop. >> were people living in a while back then? >> i don't think so. my interaction with the business owners on that street who did not want me and my friends doing what we were doing. >> it change in four years since i've rented tha
not become greece? it is interesting that we talked about the fiscal coordination have in the countries and to last come along and bail them out when they have not done what they're supposed to do? i do not know that we are that much different. we have a great panel. people thought are far smarter than i am. i will introduce them now. and then i will sit down and i did ask some questions to revival at the panel to keep their answers relatively short so we can run through a lot of questions and get out of here on time. we have ailson frasier, director of the institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues, including federal spending, taxes, the debt and deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor. next, rudy penner, the institute fellow and the rj and francis miller chair in public policy at the urban institute. prior to that in his long career, he was director of the congressional bu
seem like an emerging market economy here. >> are we greece? >> our politics are becoming as dysfunctional as greece. i mean, we're not greece, but if you look at what businessmen say about why they're not investing in the u.s., they will often give dysfunctional politics in washington as the top answer. it's not even tax rates that people are concerned about. it's just getting a deal, getting people aligned. >> we're going to roll some tape, but i just wanted to ask you quickly, last week your sort of advice to republicans was don't cave, compromise. >> right. >> so this week, given what we've seen so far, we see these one-on-one negotiations taking place, what do you think the best strategy on the part of the republicans is? >> don't cave. compromise. you're not going to get 35%. you're just not going to. you're not going to. the economy will go up in flames. you're just not going to get 35%. the president needs to understand he's not going to get 39.6%. if i were sitting in the house and the president asked me to go four, five percentage points up on tax rates right now
. the way that we look back and preserve the, you know, some of the ruins in rome and greece. i don't think we want to lose that. you know, as far as what it becomes, i have no idea. sorry. [laughter] >> yeah, back there. >> [inaudible] >> former neighbor. >> exactly. great neighbor, by the way, also. [laughter] my question is, you know, i love detroit, moved to new york also, moved back, and just tremendously in love with the city still. i've been back now for six years, and just, i mean, every day there's shotgun new about the city that i just fall -- something new about the city that i just fall in love with. i live outside the city, but the question is what neighborhood or area did you find most fascinating? just really just wowed, this is the cool or the bomb shell, you know, that you just could not, you know leave out of, and you just had to go there, like, the next day. >> i'll mention two. first, our street. this was another weird moment. i was looking for a sort of semifurnished apartment, found it on craig's list, and there was a single block, you know, a service street, yeah, not
can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending to% of gdp on national security. -- 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because it cannot afford it. host: democratic caller, new jersey. caller: i am a retired attorney colonel. i've done a lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about social security and medicare, the entitlements, and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. it has no part today in a problem. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund, the huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 were people stopped paying taxes and started drawing welfare, and number three, we have the tax cuts, the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which have severely reduced the amount of revenue. the tax burden on americans from the federal government today is an 80-year low. we cannot fund the government with the revenues and loss in jobs that we have. host: cbo has done
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
this morning. i had no idea -- i had no idea it was an immigrant company. >> you thought it was from greece. [laughter] >> exactly, you know. i had no idea. these google -- all of these companies which maybe it needs to be a marketing campaign. i don't know. but something i think should be done to change the image of immigrants and make it more positive, and i think that will facilitate everything we're talking about today. so how do you guys think we can maybe change that image of immigrants and make it more positive and not make everybody, when they think of immigrants think of border wars on history channel. >> well, at different times and places, immigrants have been viewed more or less favorably in the united states. this is a nation of immigrants. but when immigration was largely cut off during the 1920's, a lot of americans became somewhat estranged from the immigrant roots of their forebearers. and lost a sense that we were a nation of immigrants. but in some parts of the country today you see the enormous economic vitality it comes with a really diverse and active population that a
like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money by selling off assets including the aircraft leasing unit that complemented aig's airplane insurance business. if u.s. regulators apro s appro deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the
borrow any more money until we fix this country from becoming greece, and that requires significant entitlement reform. >> reporter: for the record, senator graham is not one of those who favors increasing tax rates on the wealthy. he favors more revenue from them by capping deductions. cheryl and dennis. dennis: thanks very much, peter barnes. and our next guest says many republicans in private are conceding they may have to give president obama much of what he wants. we are joined by potomac research group political strategist, greg vallier. so do you think president obama will win a twofer; higher tax rates on the rich and deduction caps to get the rich to pay more as well? >> maybe. it's moving in that direction. i think peter barnes in the previous piece got it exactly right. i think the republicans in private, dennis, are beginning to say let's cut a deal on this, we'll come back and fight again when we really do have leverage. that's on the debt ceiling fight in february. dennis: how can voters have any faith that if they do tax hikes now and wait for spending cuts later they
, guess, take a guess. it is a greece. tracy: i was going to say italy. i really was. ashley: they're not far behind. annual corruption index says all the countries embroiled in financial crisis top the list in europe, spain, portugal, yes, operationsy, italy. it measures the perception of the corruption in the public sector. as the most corrupt nations in the world. here we go. afghanistan, north korea, and somalia top the list. on the other side of the spectrum, countries with least perceived corruption, denmark, fin left-hand and new zealand. where does the u.s. rank? 19th. tracy: nobody lives in those countries. ashley: what they do is very simple and very clean. tracy: very blond. ashley: very blond. definitely in denmark and finland, that's for sure. tracy: the dark skin, the dark eyes. we're all evil at heart. ashley: that is the quote of the day. thanks, tracy. i didn't say that. tracy: all right. quarter after. come on. right? think about it. as we do every 15 minutes we check on the markets, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. from the most corr
there are two that we're watching for american investors. one is greece, one is italy. the developments today are both good from an american investing perspective because they keep a lid on what's happening in those two respects. in greece there was trouble on the streets of athens last night as a result of left-wing protesters and students out and police using tear gas to disperse them as they protested the death of a teenager as a result of a police shooting four years ago, but the more important thing from a market perspective is that in 30 minutes' time now, the book will close on the greek debt buyback. now, remember what's happening here. the greek government is borrowing 10 billion euros from the rest of europe to buy back its own debt at a discount. if it does that successfully, by midday our time when that book closes, then more cash will flow through from the rest of europe, possibly next week it will be able to repay its bills and capitalize on the banks. let's check the close. >> the european markets are closing now. >> so we kind of went nowhere today. a lot of these markets in e
as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto industry. the white house is giving money for new police stations, homeland security is trying to sustain the fire department in detroit. we're talking about a series of bailouts that continue in order to keep detroit proposed up. i don't know how long that is sustainable. >> the movecy called "detropia." you just made the academy awards documentary short list. congratulations on that. >> thank you. >> good luck with it. >>> we've got to take a short break. just ahead, we'll talk syria. we'll discuss that. space needle, pot party there broke out there right at midnight. i wonder why. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woma
. president, and use your mandate to bring this country together to stop us from becoming greece. >> okay. there we go. some advice there for the president. >>> here with us now former white house counselor for president bush. ceo of the consulting firm, hill and milton strategies. dan bartlett back at the table. good to have you this morning. a couple must reads to look at. >> you can ask a question if i can ask rattner a question. you go first. >> when are you going to man up? what happened, man? we republicans, we used to drive liberals crazy. we'd win elections we shouldn't win. we would steal senate seats we should never steal. we would shock -- they never saw it coming. willie geist talked about the morning after the 2004 election, you had liberals on the upper west sidewalking around like zombies. some of them walked straight into the hudson river. that doesn't happen. we're not the smart party, we're the stupid party. what happened? >> well, there's that. >> what happened in '12? how did we perform so badly? is it our tactics? >> well, the primary process obviously didn't help us
? greece has been very good at ignoring their debt ceiling and now they have 25% unemployment, 50% youth unemployment. you have young people having to leave the cities to go to the country to engage in subsistence agriculture. so that's what happens when you ignore your debt ceiling. >> gretchen: okay. congressman, i got to wrap it up there. if you actually is to hang your stocking there, i might have to send you some champagne, too. sorry about that. >> please do. >> gretchen: congressman, have a great rest of the day and merry christmas to you. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up, news week declares that the war on christmas is over. so is that true? we report. you can decide. then thousands of people about to lose their homes because the government wants to regulate rain. yep. bulldoze the houses and plant a little grass. is that the answer? that's coming up. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more pcessed flakes look nothing like natural grains. i'm eating what i kn is better nutrition. mmmm. grea
fiscal accounts in balance and move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it is interesting that we talk about the -- the previous panel talked about state government and one big problem in europe is there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries analogous somewhat to our states and who has to bail them out when they haven't done what they are supposed to do? i don't know that we are all that much different. so, we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am. i'm going to introduce them now and i will introduce them all and i will sit down and i get to ask some questions. i will ask the panel to keep i will ask the panel to keep their answers
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
,000 atms and etc.. the same time to do it a in a way we can provide greece service for them regardless of how much revenue is available for them. a lot to talk about what we are doing and not doing. we have a great transaction platform for core a america. we have kept prices down. what we are looking for is, what is the model to serve customers going forward? we are seeing 70,000 do bubble banking customers. half a million czechs get deposited by people taking pictures of them now. the behavior has changed so fast 20 million texts that go out every month saying imbalance as well, make sure you do not overdraft. all of that put together is a tremendous level to serve customers traditionally with branches and atms and things like that. you can provide better service and you do not have to charge fees. >> we have time for a few questions from the audience. if i can ask you to -- it state who you are and who you are with. if you could also keep your questions >> so we can get to as many questions as possible. i think i have somebody walking around with microphones. >> are you indicating or
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)